Marquess of Bath Biography

There is nothing noble about it. A biography about the life of the 7th Marquess of Bath and current holder of the title gives an in-depth psychological analysis of one of aristocracy’s most prominent nut-cases. While many visitors flock to Longleat’s Safari Park, few of them are aware of the constant private warfare waged on the estate though some of it has swapped over into the newspapers recently.

Alexander Thynne, 7th Marquess of Bath



Nesta Wyn Ellis’ The Marquess Of Bath: Lord Of Love was published by Dynasty Press. It is a fact that the publishers decide on the titles of books they care to publish, but a more inept title could hardly have been chosen for this particular biography. It would be of an advantage if editors cared to read the book and understand its content before giving it an totally unsuitable title.

Longleat House

The catastrophe of a title should not distract from the brilliant book Nesta Wyn Ellis has written. She drew on 40 hours of interviews she conducted with the Marquess to compile his life's story. Her brilliance is not in the recounting of a rather flat and uninspiring life of someone living in a void, but in the psychological analysis of how her subject got there.

Longleat House

Alexander Thynne was born as the elder son and heir of Henry Thynne 6th Marquess of Bath. His parents divorced when he was eight. His father was a well known Nazi sympathizer and Hitler fan. He collected Nazi memorabilia and ran the family like a German military unit. His mother outed herself as a cougar after the divorce. Both didn't inspire Alexander to lead a more worthwhile and rewarding life, contrariwise.

Longleat House

Alexander never forgave his father for selling part of the Longleat library as this sale cut into his inheritance. Typically though, he sold heirlooms for 24 million pounds in 2004. After his father’s death, he waited just long enough to be sure the body was securely entombed before chucking out his brother Lord Christopher Thynne from Longleat. He professes to socialism and meritocracy while ferociously clinging on to title and inherited worldly goods. And these are his more charming character traits.

Longleat House

In 1969, he married Hungarian born Abigail Gyarmarthy for the sole reason to procure an heir. The Marchioness lives in Paris for obvious reasons. If Scrooge hadn't already been invented, the Marquess would be the model upon which the character was built. He is no pauper with an estimated fortune of over 150 million pounds. But he is a miser; Longleat serves plonk and tinned food should you be unlucky enough to have to visit there for a meal. When holidaying in France in his house there, he refuses to eat out. While he says that it is because of his dislike for French cuisine, we all know what eating out in France costs.

Longleat House

He had 75 mistresses before and since his marriage to Abigail. He calls them wifelets and some of them inhabit cottages on the estate of Longleat. While this might give the impression that they received at least a consolation prize, in reality they pay a normal rent to bolster his miserly income. None of them ever saw a penny from him, just in case you wondered. Current and past wifelets wage a constant and tiring war of attrition (now you know why the Marchioness lives in Paris, apart from food and drink).

Alexander Thynne, 7th Marquess of Bath


Ellis’ mastery in this book does not stop at the mere collection of sordid facts; she analyses the freak of Bath step by step by looking into all these happenings. The picture she paints is shocking, and after you overcome your distaste about the person of the Marquess, you might even consider giving him some sympathy for being such a loser.