Showing posts with label children. Show all posts
Showing posts with label children. Show all posts

How The Afterlife Works

Power of the Heir's Passion by L. R. W. Lee is a sort of a prequel to the Andy Smithson series. I assure you that this is the most accurate description of afterlife available, for the world of Oomladee, not ours. It is subtitled A Novella; not quite a book but too long for a short story. And it's a ghost story from start to end.



The Stolen Kingdom

The Stolen Kingdom by Ross Rosenfeld is a very unhappy book, or maybe an unfortunate one. It definitely suffers from multiple personae disorder. It tells the story of the missing prince in a new way; the story is placed in an imaginary Europe without giving away any cultural details as to where exactly it is.


Phoenix Rising

In book 4 of the Andy Smithson series, Phoenix, Arizona, receives visitors from Oomladee for a change. Resurrection of the Phoenix's Grace by L. R. W. Lee sees the conflict crossing the magical border before Andy's Mom sends him back to Oomladee when the situation at home gets out of hand and way too dangerous.




Call the Unicorns

Book 3 in the Andy Smithson series sees our hero return to foggy Oomaldee after having been sent home to this world at the end of book 2. Disgrace of the Unicorn's Honor by L. R. W. Lee is another offering in fairy creatures and wild places that need exploring in a quest. It is no let-down compared to the previous two books.


A Marquis, a Dog, and Cows in London Parks

Cows in London's Park are nothing new or revolutionary, as much as councils may try to make it look that way. There were cows (as part of the amusements offered) there in Georgian time. Georgette Heyer's heroine finds that out to her chagrin when she takes her oversize dog walking one day. And that is just one of the many scrapes she and her family get into.




Summers in Maine

Take a trip down memory lane to long summers spent at the camp or at the family house on the coast. The memoir is lovingly built and gives a believable and charming picture of family summers spent in Maine in the 1960s. Up to the point where tragedy strikes and the reader encounters the dark side of backwater America.




The Little Prince: 70 Years After Publication

The Little Prince has grown big over the years, really huge, since its first double publication (French and English) in New York in 1943. There are few other books that have been translated into over 200 languages. Some of these languages have otherwise only ever seen the bible translated before. This book can therefore be said to have been and still being a huge success. But what makes it so special?